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Law Offices of

Patrick F. Lauer, Jr. LLC

Pennsylvania Criminal Defense

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  4.  » Examining the lifelong impact of violent crime

Violence can upend the lives of both perpetrator and victim. Even a single violent experience can create damaging consequences that may never go away completely.

Examining the connection between violent crime and other issues may provide encouragement for people to avoid violence altogether.

The definition of violent crime

When a crime causes injury to another person or group of people, it qualifies as a violent crime. According to the National Institute of Justice, violent crime also includes threats of violence. Even if a physical injury does not happen, a threat of violence still counts as a violent crime.

Violent crimes include the following:

  • Sexual assault
  • Elder abuse
  • Gun violence
  • Domestic violence
  • Kidnapping
  • Armed robbery

The consequences of violent crime

Perhaps the most obvious consequence of violent crime is the injuries inflicted on innocent victims. These injuries can range from minor to fatal. According to healthypeople.gov, even witnesses of violence can suffer debilitating side effects including PTSD, anxiety and increased aggression. Perpetrators of violent crime can suffer a life of shame, guilt, difficulty finding employment, addiction and significant legal repercussions.

Violence often stems from a form of mental illness. Children exposed to violence at a young age develop a skewed perception of how to manage and cope with stress, pressure and strong emotions. Recognizing that exposure to violence is a public health issue and requires intervention at the earliest point may incentivize people to look for ways to reduce violence within their communities. With a renewed focus on mental health, emotional processing and trigger management, people may have a chance at overcoming violent tendencies.